48 Questions Most Frequently Asked By People with OCD

If you have OCD then at some point in your life, you’ve probably asked over half of these questions.

These Questions About OCD Are Very Reasonable to Ask

These questions will be answered in some form…in some manner…at some point… 

Questions About Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts

Why am I having these specific thoughts? Who cares? You’ll never figure it out.

Why am I obsessed about this and not something else? Your brain is on overdrive trying to protect something that is precious and sacred to you.

What do these thoughts say about me? They say that you’re thinking like the rest of us.

Shouldn’t I be able to control these thoughts and stop them? I’m sorry I didn’t know you had a power that no one else has.

Am I going to act on these thoughts? Time will tell. Meanwhile live your life.

Why do they seem so very, very real to me? Hmmm…Maybe thoughts are connected to the central NERVOUS system.

 Questions About “Why Me?”

What if I’m having these thoughts because they’re premonitions or it’s my intuition? Time to play the lottery then.

How do I know this is OCD? What if it’s not? Time will tell.

Did something happen in my past that gave me OCD? Whatever the case, when you’re ready to confront OCD you’ll have to suspend analysis.

It’s bad enough everything else I’m dealing with, and now this? It’s better to figure out what all of this makes possible. A positive mindset is like kryptonite to OCD. It deprives OCD of its powers. A negative mindset and a positive mindset can’t coexist. Only one can be the master.

What kind of God gives people OCD? It’s nothing more than an assumption that God is the cause of suffering. You can find no evidence of this. 

“I lift mine eyes to the hills; from where does my help come?” (Psalms 121:1-2) The psalmist isn’t saying his pain comes from God. He’s saying my help comes from God. 

For a life-changing read, get the book, When Bad Things Happen to Good People by Harold S. Kushner.

Shouldn’t everyone be worried about this? Follow the majority. In a room full of 100 people, how many would be worried. Not many? Then this is unreasonable worry.

Questions About Telling People

Should I tell people I have OCD? If you disclose do it gladly and don’t complain if people don’t give you the response you hoped for.

When do I let the person I’m dating know that I have OCD? What is the purpose of telling them? I’m not saying you shouldn’t. I’m asking what do you hope to achieve by telling them? I ask this question of my clients and my favorite answer is, “I think it’s time to tell them so that they understand I don’t need their protection. I want them to help me to confront, not avoid.”

My spouse doesn’t know what I obsess about. Should s/he? The content of your obsession is irrelevant. It’s more important that your significant other understand the nature of OCD and how he or she can help without feeding OCD.

Should I tell my job I have OCD? There’s no blanket answer for this. If you need reasonable accommodations then you’ll tell them. 

Questions About Medication

Has anyone ever tried [this] medication? Yup. Did it help? Nope. Yup. Not sure.

When can I stop taking this drug? If you stop the drug then you’ve got to make sure there is PLENTY of exercise, adequate sleep, juggling, meditation, comedy, affection, thrills and adventure, healthy eating, self-compassion and tree hugging in your life.

Is there a drug that works better than others? Every BODY is different.

How long does it take for this drug to work? It varies.

Can I get healthy without medication? You’ve got to make sure there is PLENTY of reasonable exercise, adequate sleep, juggling, meditation, comedy, affection, thrills, adventure, healthy eating, self-compassion and tree hugging in your life. If you can’t put that combo together, take the medication.

Questions About How to Respond to Thoughts

What does it mean to “sit” with the thoughts? They’re unwanted. I don’t want them! How am I supposed to just let them be there? I just spoke with someone on the telephone who’s never had therapy for her OCD. She asked me the same question.  She said the chatter is 24/7. She repeatedly said, “I don’t want these thoughts.” The more you don’t want them the more they’ll keep coming.

As long as I’m busy I can try to avoid the thoughts. Stay busy, that’s good, right? Nope. Welcome the thoughts. Provoke the thoughts but don’t try to avoid them. It’s not about staying busy. It’s about living your life. Doing what you WANT to to and NEED to do.

Can’t I replace a bad thought with a good thought? Yikes.

I’d never act on these thoughts, right? It’s just OCD. Right? Time will tell.

Have you ever heard of anyone else who has these thoughts? If you have OCD and I’m an OCD specialist…what are the chances?

Questions About OCD Morphing

Why did I have two completely OCD-free days and then boom, it’s ba-a-a-ack??? A setback is a setup for a breakthrough.

Can the obsession change? How often can it change? Nothing has meaning except the meaning you give it.

Even if I get unstuck about [this] won’t I just get stuck on the next thing? Nothing has meaning except the meaning you give it.

I shrugged this one off years ago. But, now it’s back and I can’t seem to get past it like I did once before. Why? Nothing has meaning except the meaning you give it.

Questions about Anger

Why am I so angry? You’re feeling like a victim? You’re not being assertive? You’re doing something, but not gladly?

I don’t seem to have any patience. Why? This isn’t who I used to be. You’re trying to answer something that isn’t answerable?

Why do I always feel like a volcano about to explode? You’re not being assertive? You’re not stepping out of your comfort zone?

I used to be passionate. Now I’m just angry. Why? Anger is a form of passion!

Questions About Concentrating

Is my brain fried or something? I can’t focus! Start juggling.

Why do I have to reread everything? I feel like I can’t comprehend anything I read! Start juggling.

Why can’t I be present? I feel like I can’t listen to anybody. I feel disconnected. Practice being in the here and now. Use all of your senses and stay in this moment. Right here, right now, you’re pretty ok. You can’t feel certain emotions until you’re out of this storm.

I can’t get anything done. My mind is racing. Should I take time off? To do what? Race more?

Questions About Journaling

Would it help if I journal about things that make me anxious every day? It’s good to make a list of your triggers so you can eventually confront them.

Should I write down all my thoughts. Keep track of them? It’s good to make a list of your thoughts so that you can rank them in terms of easiest to hardest and then begin to confront them starting with the easiest.

Should I journal about my feelings? Maybe it would help to get my feelings out. Feelings are the problem not the solution. Focus on action. Life rewards action.

Questions about ERP

 

What if I’m in the small percentage of people who can’t be helped by ERP? Time will tell.

What if I haven’t told you everything you need to know? Oh well.

Can you guarantee it will work? Can you guarantee I don’t have cancer?

Won’t ERP make my OCD worse? Since when does stepping out of your comfort zone the first time feel better!

This whole idea about doing exposures feels too overwhelming. Don’t you think we should wait until I feel ready for this? You might wait a very long time and meanwhile life passes you by.

What other kinds of therapy can treat OCD besides ERP? CBT is more than ERP.

I tried this once before and my anxiety didn’t come down. What if my anxiety doesn’t come down? You can do anything feeling anxious. You can’t do much avoiding.

Ready for the answers to all of these questions?

Ha!

Of course I have an answer for every question!

But, I think YOUR answers would be VERY interesting.

In fact, I’m so confident about how interesting your answers will be, that I’m going to gift my recent book, “The OCD Coloring Book Journal” to the five people who answer these questions, in a manner that reflects the most effective way to Boss OCD Back.

You don’t have to answer every question!

This contest will end 2/4/17. 
Enter your anonymous answers in the comment section of this post. I can’t wait!!!

7 thoughts on “48 Questions Most Frequently Asked By People with OCD”

  1. Some of my answers contain humor. They do so because I believe humor is wonderful, and life needs humor because sometimes it’s humorous. Laughter can be an excellent medicine.

    Why am I having these specific thoughts?

    Why not these specific thoughts? And if you didn’t have these thoughts, you’d have THOSE thoughts, and you don’t want those … you may not be able to handle them! The specific obsessions do not matter. Contamination or harm? I’m pretty confident it makes no difference.

    Why am I obsessed about this and not something else?

    Why not this? If it weren’t this, it would be that. Again, not sure I want that!

    What do these thoughts say about me?

    They say that you have the thoughts that you’re having. Nothing more, nothing less.

    Shouldn’t I be able to control these thoughts and stop them?
    I don’t think so. Very little is actually in my control. I can’t control the weather, I can’t control the people around me, and I can’t control my obsessions. The only thing I have some control over is my responses to my unwanted thoughts.

    Am I going to act on these thoughts?

    I’m not sure, you might. I’ll get back to you.

    Why do they seem so very, very real to me?

    They seem very, very real to you because you have a wild imagination. Ever have a dream where when you woke up, it seemed extremely real? Well when we’re ruminating, it’s like daydreaming, but not nearly as fun. I think that’s the reason. I’m not sure.

    What if I’m having these thoughts because they’re premonitions or it’s my intuition?

    That’s possible, but I don’t always trust my intuition. Sometimes my intuition tells me to fight the thoughts harder, and I’m not sure that’s correct – in fact, I’m pretty sure that’s the wrong thing to do.

    How do I know this is OCD? What if it’s not?

    I don’t know if this is OCD. I can get an idea if this is OCD by asking those around me if they think my thought is reasonable, but that would be reassurance, and reassurance isn’t the best idea. So, in short, it may be OCD or it may not be.

    Did something happen in my past that gave me OCD?

    I’m not sure. It’s possible. Either I was born with it, or something in my environment caused it. I’ve got it down to those two options. I think they call it nature versus nurture. I don’t think it matters either way.

    It’s bad enough everything else I’m dealing with, and now this?

    Well, life isn’t always fair. I wish it were sometimes, but it’s not. I have to deal with things as they are, not as I wish they could be.

    What kind of God gives people OCD?

    I’m not sure what kind of God gives people OCD. I’d have to ask him but I’m in no hurry to do so. I’ll just settle for the fact that I have OCD and attempt to manage it.

    Shouldn’t everyone be worried about this?

    I don’t think so. Worrying is like being in a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn’t get you anywhere.
    Should I tell people I have OCD?

    If you want to tell people you have OCD, go for it. If you don’t want to tell people you have OCD, you can do that too. What if you tell the “wrong” person you have OCD? Additionally, who is the wrong person, anyway? That’s a chance you’ll have to take if you decide to share your OCD.

    When do I let the person I’m dating know that I have OCD?

    Well, first of all, I don’t trust the judgment of any girl that would have me as a boyfriend. However, it’s up to the individual. I wouldn’t lead off with “Hi, my name is John, and I have OCD” because 1) that’s not a good first line and 2) OCD is not who I am, it’s something I have. I’d probably let her know a few dates in.

    My spouse doesn’t know what I obsess about. Should s/he?

    You can share with your spouse if you believe he or she needs to know. As I said earlier, the specific obsession doesn’t actually matter. We may think it does, but it doesn’t. What matters is whether you do a compulsion on that thought or not.

    Should I tell my job I have OCD?

    Honestly I’m not sure about this. I suppose if it’s affecting your performance in some way and you’re asked what’s wrong, you may want to share … just don’t expect them to fully understand. I’ve had OCD for a very long time and I still don’t fully understand it.

    Has anyone ever tried [this] medication? Did it help?

    I think different medications may help different people in different ways, but there is no magic pill (that I know of). All a medication can do is give you a little nudge. The hard parts are up to you.

    When can I stop taking this drug?

    I’m not sure. The only way to find out is to stop taking it, at which point you may find that you weren’t ready to go off it yet. Like many things in life, this one can only be learned through experience.

    Is there a drug that works better than others?

    As I already said, I think different drugs will work for different people. None of us are the same, unless you’re an identical twin – even then, you aren’t exactly the same.

    How long does it take for this drug to work?

    I can’t answer that one. Maybe the drug won’t do anything at all?

    Can I get healthy without medication?

    Well, first of all, I think a person with OCD is OTHERWISE “healthy.” We just have a tiny little issue of seemingly never-ending hellish thoughts. However, I think some people can manage their OCD without medication. I’m not sure, though.

    What does it mean to “sit” with the thoughts? They’re unwanted. I don’t want them! How am I supposed to just let them be there?

    Well, if you don’t want them, they may come on stronger. You have to either really want them (I mean REALLY, not pretending to) or not mind having them. This is difficult, but isn’t it better than constantly being under attack from “unwanted” thoughts?

    As long as I’m busy I can try to avoid the thoughts. Stay busy, that’s good, right?

    No, we don’t want to avoid the thoughts. Avoidance does not work. I’ve tried it, and I’m pretty sure it doesn’t work. Plus I’m lazy so I don’t want to be constantly busy. I guess what I’m saying is that you probably should be able to sit peacefully and just let your thoughts come in (and leave, too. This isn’t a roach motel).

    Can’t I replace a bad thought with a good thought?

    You can try, but I don’t think it will work very well. I would advise against it. Just take your thoughts as they are and accept them. I’m pretty sure this takes OCD’s power away.
    I’d never act on these thoughts, right? It’s just OCD. Right?
    I honestly can’t answer that. You probably won’t act on your thoughts … but you might.

    Have you ever heard of anyone else who has these thoughts?

    I think that question is silly because I have no answer for it. I would imagine that other people have had my thoughts, but
    does it really matter?

    Why did I have two completely OCD-free days and then boom, it’s ba-a-a-ack???

    Well, that’s because OCD is a big meany-pants and doesn’t fight fair. The correct response isn’t “it’s ba-a-a-ack?” The correct response may be “Oh, you’re back again! Welcome. You bore me, so I’m not sure how long you’ll be staying.”
    Can the obsession change? How often can it change?
    I think the obsession can change, yes. The number ranges between zero times and 487. Well, maybe not 487, but quite a few.

    Even if I get unstuck about [this] won’t I just get stuck on the next thing?

    That’s a possibility. Again, though, the specific obsession does not seem to matter. I know I sound like a broken record, but that’s what I believe. (Great, now I may obsess over broken records!)

    I shrugged this one off years ago. But, now it’s back and I can’t seem to get past it like I did once before. Why?

    Are you certain that you completely shrugged it off? And if you did shrug it off once, isn’t it just possible that you can manage it again? Once again, the specific obsession does not really make a difference.

    Why am I so angry?

    I can’t really answer that, as I’m not a very angry person. If you’re going to be angry with something, get angry at the OCD and use that as motivation to manage it better. What I do get is frustrated and sad, but fighting with obsessive thoughts for years can do that to a person.

    I don’t seem to have any patience. Why? This isn’t who I used to be.

    I have far too much patience, I think. I understand if some people with OCD don’t feel as if they have any patience because OCD takes a lot out of you, and it’s something that is understandable to lose patience with. If you have no patience with OCD, I believe that you should understand that it’s important (not urgent, but very important) to learn how to manage it. Perhaps then you’ll get your patience back?

    Why do I always feel like a volcano about to explode?

    Either the OCD has made you extremely frustrated or you’ve eaten some bad food.

    I used to be passionate. Now I’m just angry. Why?

    I think OCD can beat you down so much that it seems as if your passions are gone. I think they’re still in there somewhere, though, and you may find them again in the future. I may be wrong, but then again, I could always be wrong.

    Is my brain fried or something? I can’t focus!

    I don’t think your brain is fried – you’d smell that. Perhaps instead of saying “I can’t focus,” you should instead say “I’m having trouble focusing right now.” Maybe you could try an activity that helps with both focus and patience, such as juggling?

    Why do I have to reread everything? I feel like I can’t comprehend anything I read!

    If all of your energy is being used by your brain in order to feed your obsessive thoughts, it’s going to be difficult to take in outside information. I’ve “watched” entire movies before and missed a majority because I was busy ruminating. I’m not sure the brain can focus completely on multiple things at once.

    Why can’t I be present? I feel like I can’t listen to anybody. I feel disconnected.

    It seems as if you can’t be present for the same reason you have to reread things. If you’re using your mental energy for compulsions, it’s going to be difficult to hear those around you.

    I can’t get anything done. My mind is racing. Should I take time off?

    Is it really true that you can’t get ANYTHING done? Is it possible that you are getting some things done, and you just don’t realize it? If you really can’t get anything done, it’s possible that someone will let you know.

    Would it help if I journal about things that make me anxious every day?

    I’m not sure. It may help if you can monitor your progress over time, but it may also cause you to look at the journal constantly to reassure yourself that you’re getting better and doing things right. In short, I don’t know if it will help.

    Should I write down all my thoughts. Keep track of them?

    If I started writing down all my thoughts, I’d probably eventually say to myself, “Wait, does this even matter?” followed by a chuckle, then by crumpling up the paper and throwing it away. If writing down a specific bad thought over and over will help you desensitize, then it may be worth doing.

    Should I journal about my feelings? Maybe it would help to get my feelings out.

    For my thoughts on journaling feelings, please see my thoughts on writing down thoughts.

    What if I’m in the small percentage of people who can’t be helped by ERP?

    Again, that’s possible, but the way I see it, the options are this: 1) You try ERP, and it helps you or 2) You try ERP and it does nothing (or very little). The only sure way to fail (or not be helped) is to never try in the first place.

    What if I haven’t told you everything you need to know?

    That could be, but how would I know specifically what you need to know? I’m not a mind-reader and I’m not going through the rest of my life analyzing everything. Does it really matter if you know my entire life story? It’s possible that I could sit down and tell someone every single thing about myself and I still wouldn’t make progress. It’s also possible that I say a small amount myself and I do make progress.

    Can you guarantee it will work?

    No. There are very few guarantees in life and this isn’t one of them.

    Won’t ERP make my OCD worse?

    It’s possible that ERP will make your OCD worse, but it’s also possible that it will make your ERP better. It could also leave your OCD unchanged (I think those are all of the options…) The only way to learn which option it will be is to try ERP.

    This whole idea about doing exposures feels too overwhelming. Don’t you think we should wait until I feel ready for this?

    I think if you wait until you are ready, you may never get around to doing it. For example, I was going to answer these questions later, but I said to myself, “What better place than here, and what better time than now?”

    What other kinds of therapy can treat OCD besides ERP?
    One I’ve heard of is ACT, which stands for Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. I don’t know much about it, but in one way I think I already practice my own version: even if I’m not feeling very confident, I sometimes ACT as if I am. This is also known as “fake-it’-til-you-make-it” and I believe sometimes it’s a good idea.

    I tried this once before and my anxiety didn’t come down. What if my anxiety doesn’t come down?

    Well, if my math is right, you’ve now tried it twice and your anxiety has not come down. Why not try it a third time? The alternative is to keep using compulsions on those lovely obsessive thoughts, and we know how great that is! (Not. That was sarcasm. Using compulsions on obsessions is like using gasoline on a fire.)

    I leave you with this wonderful quote from Winston Churchill that I believe is appropriate: “Never give in. Never give in. Never, never, never, never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in, except to convictions of honor and good sense. Never yield to force. Never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.” (Of course, OCD isn’t an enemy. It’s a part of us. It’s like a well-intentioned friend who just so happens to constantly screw us up and tells us things that may be incorrect.)

  2. First off, if we are voting on great responses- I think the first commenter did a fabulous job and deserves a prize so far.
    I’ll try my best with 3 questions that speak to me:

    * Shouldn’t I be able to control these thoughts and stop them?

    No, I can’t control when these unwanted thoughts pop into my head, but I have the power to choose what to focus on. I also know that noticing the anxiety the thought is giving me only fuels the fire, gives more power to the OCD and increases my anxiety. To take its power away, I can say, “Yes, that’s entirely possible. If that happens, I will create a plan to deal with it. I am an intelligent person and I can figure out a way to get through the situation as dire as it may be. But IT is NOT happening yet, so let me put my mental energy into the most important task at hand.”

    *Why did I have two completely OCD-free days and then boom, it’s ba-a-a-ack???

    Just like some days I can resist that piece of candy after lunch, some days I can have more mental strength than others. Success for 2 days or 4 days or 56 days doesn’t mean that OCD isn’t lurking around the corner. But what will help is for me to remind myself that I have knowledge and experience that OCD does not. I am a much more intelligent being. I can apply those skills that I know I have, perhaps I haven’t had to use for awhile, having had success for a period of time. Maybe I have too much on my plate, maybe I am not feeling well, maybe I haven’t had enough down time- whatever the reason I can remember what I have learned and apply it once again, and again, and again. Success with something one day does not guarantee the same success the next day. But more success can be mine when I remember what I have learned, what I know about OCD.

    *Should I tell people I have OCD?

    I don’t think this is a should question. Some people I have told and some I have not. It comes down to the comfort level I have regarding that person. As well, if it is helpful for someone I work closely with to assist me by perhaps not reassuring me, then yes I will benefit from that exchange of information. If I choose not to tell someone it is not due to embarrassment or shame. Everyone has their issues- some we can see, some we can’t. It’s the day to day work we do that matters, not who knows or doesn’t know.

    Those are my thoughts. Good luck to all the participants!

  3. Churchill also said, ” When you’re going through hell, keep going.” A reminder put so well to get through, not linger, in our worries and issues.

  4. While some of these thoughts sounded like helpful steps towards improvement, (telling Tammy you can’t focus and asking how you can improve that) many of them just sounded like OCD chatting! As I scrolled through the list I saw a lot of thoughts Tammy told me NOT to engage with. She would answer them once and then say don’t ask again! I think, overall, most of these thoughts could be answered wth shrugging. Whether it’s saying “well, that COULD be, but I’ll just have to wait and see!” Or flooding, “Not only will OCD be worse tomorrow, it will be worse every day of the month! Oh well! Bring it on!” The basic attitude is, who cares? Get informed one time about these questions if there is genuine confusion and then DONT answer them anymore! I know I am guilty of this but I’m working on it!

  5. For someone with OCD, I think the same answer can be used for almost all of these questions: “It doesn’t matter. What action can I (you) take?” I admittedly have asked many if not all of these questions. The most powerful response is usually “oh well….” Our brains would love the answers, but really how many of these questions could have a definitive answer?

  6. I echo the comment that the first commenter’s answers were great!! I see some of these questions as unanswerable in the way that you cannot try to reason with OCD. For the Medication ones, I think that varies so much by the individual and even in my own experience, 20 years of medication, the effective ones vary as I’ve aged, changes life circumstances, etc. Great questions though! Provoking me to re-examine my approach is always a positive push. Thanks Tammy!!

  7. What do these thoughts say about me?
    Unwanted, OCD-controlled thoughts do not say anything about you as a person, your worth, or who you want to be, except that you are dealing with a mental condition that is more common than you may realise.
    What kind of God gives people OCD?
    God is never the cause of the suffering we face. While experts are not entirely clear on what causes OCD, many different factors come into play- genetics and/or environmental factors could be involved, and so on.
    Can I get healthy without medication?
    Yes you can! There are many effective strategies of coping with OCD that do not involve medication.
    What does it mean to “sit” with the thoughts? They’re unwanted. I don’t want them!
    How am I supposed to just let them be there? 
    To “sit” with obsessive thoughts means to allow yourself to experience those thoughts without judging them or performing a compulsion to allay the anxiety. Sitting with the thoughts without reacting to them is an important step in enabling you to see that while they are unpleasant, they pose no threat. They just are.
    As long as I’m busy I can try to avoid the thoughts. Stay busy, that’s good, right?
    Trying to avoid the thoughts will not allow you to fully experience them. If you allow yourself to sit with the thoughts, fully experiencing them, you will attach less importance to them and the obsessions will come to mind less frequently. However, it can be good to ‘keep busy’ in the sense of going on with your day and refusing to let the thoughts interfere with your regular activities.
    Can’t I replace a bad thought with a good thought?
    The need to replace a bad thought with a good one is its own compulsion. It is best not to respond to your obsessive thoughts.
    Why can’t I be present? I feel like I can’t listen to anybody. I feel disconnected.
    OCD can heighten anxiety symptoms like feelings of disassociation.
    Would it help if I journal about things that make me anxious every day?
    Everyone has different ways of coping. If writing works for you, it may be worth a try. Journaling has been proven to help reduce anxiety. However, writing about what scares you may cause you to dwell on it instead. It’s important to check in with your feelings and make sure your journaling is having the desired effect.
    What if I’m in the small percentage of people who can’t be helped by ERP?
    Don’t panic; there are other ways of treating OCD.
    Won’t ERP make my OCD worse?
    At first you will experience an increase in anxiety as you expose yourself to your OCD triggers and resist performing compulsions. That is simply part of the healing process. ERP is effective in providing long-term relief.
    This whole idea about doing exposures feels too overwhelming. Don’t you think we should wait until I feel ready for this?
    Your OCD will make sure that you never feel ready. Now is the time to take control and boss it back!
    What other kinds of therapy can treat OCD besides ERP?
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) can help, so can some medications and stress management techniques.
    I tried this once before and my anxiety didn’t come down. What if my anxiety doesn’t come down?
    Likely you did not sit with the anxiety long enough the first time for it to peak and decrease. Focus on why you want to get better and give your all to trying again. Remember that your effort is worth it and that the anxiety will go down eventually. “What if” it doesn’t? Tell yourself, “So what? I accept the risk.” Doing something to try to get better accomplishes much more than doing nothing at all.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.